Tag Archives: Alimony Reform Act

Do Durational Limits Apply to Cases That Were Resolved Before the Alimony Reform Act?

The Supreme Judicial Court’s recent decision of George v. George provides guidance in applying the durational limits contained in the Alimony Reform Act. The Alimony Reform Act, which went into effect in March 2012, provides that all alimony awards that predate the Act are deemed “general term alimony.” Under G.L. c. 208, §49(b), general term … Continue Reading

Definition of Cohabitation Set in Recent Alimony Reform Act Interpretation

The latest in a series of cases interpreting and clarifying the Alimony Reform Act of 2011 has just been decided. Duff-Kareores vs. Kareores was decided by the Supreme Judicial Court on June 15, 2016. What’s the Story? The parties were married in 1995, had two children and divorced in 2004. They then lived separately, complying with … Continue Reading

It’s STILL Not Too Late to Act!

Hi there, I usually take no position on pending legislation but the proposed changes to the alimony law will adversely affect thousands of pre-existing divorce agreements. If you can, please take the time to read this update and consider calling or writing your State Representative and Senator. There is a lot of well organized force … Continue Reading

It’s Not Too Late to Act!

Hi there, Earlier in 2016 our Private Client group happily welcomed Ann “Hether” Hetherwick Cahill as an associate. Hether’s practice focuses on probate and family court litigation, including will contests, removal claims, trust disputes, equity actions, guardianship and conservatorship proceedings, and family law. We’re pleased to feature some of her thoughts on the recent developments … Continue Reading

First SJC Clarification of the New Alimony Reform Act

Hi there, With the coming of spring comes a fresh interpretation of some relatively new legislation that has been closely watched by attorneys around Massachusetts. Any new law will require interpretation by the courts, going up through the Supreme Judicial Court (SJC), before lawyers are sure of how the ambiguities in any new law will … Continue Reading
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